2.5 A IGBT and MOSFET Driver Delivers Increased Efficiency

Date
02/05/2019

Categories:
Driver Circuit, MOSFETs & Power MOSFETs

Tag:
@vishayindust #MOSFET #driver #IGBT #psd

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Device Features High Peak Output Current of 2.5 A for Motor Drives, Alternative Energy, and Other High Voltage Applications

MALVERN, Pa. — Vishay Intertechnology, Inc. broadened its optoelectronics portfolio with the introduction of a new 2.5 A IGBT and MOSFET driver. Available in DIP-8 and SMD-8 packages, the Vishay Semiconductors VOD3120A features low voltage drop on its output at a low current consumption of 3.5 mA to increase efficiency in inverter stages.

Built on CMOS technology, the optocoupler released consists of an AIGaAs LED optically coupled to an integrated circuit with a rail to rail output stage, which provides the drive voltages required by gate-controlled devices. The voltage and current supplied by the VOD3120A make it ideal for directly driving IGBTs with ratings up to 1200 V / 100 A.

With high isolation voltage ratings of VIORM = 891 V and VIOTM = 6000 V, the device provides galvanic isolation for motor drives, solar inverters, switchmode power supplies (SMPS), induction stovetops, and uninterruptable power supplies (UPS). In addition, its undervoltage lock-out (UVLO) feature protects IGBTs / MOSFETs from malfunction, while its common mode transient immunity of 35 kV/μs minimum helps to reduce noise issues from high to low voltage areas on the PCB.

The optocoupler offers a maximum propagation delay time of 0.5 µs for applications requiring fast switching. The RoHS-compliant device operates over a wide power supply range of 15 V to 30 V and an industrial temperature range from -40 °C to +105 °C.

Samples and production quantities of the VOD3120A are available now, with lead times of six weeks. Pricing for U.S. delivery starts at $1.90.

Vishay can be found on the Internet at www.vishay.com.

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