Wide Voltage Range and Small Footprint DC-DC uSLIC modules

Date
10/30/2018

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Ultra-small DC-DC power modules provide higher voltages (4 to 60V) for industrial and consumer applications

Now engineers designing into applications in factory automation, medical, communications and consumer markets can tap into four new micro-system-level IC (“uSLIC™”) modules from Maxim Integrated Products, Inc. (NASDAQ: MXIM). The MAXM17552, MAXM15064, MAXM17900 and MAXM17903 step-down DC-DC power modules join Maxim’s extensive portfolio of Himalaya power solutions, providing the widest input voltage range (4 to 60V) with the smallest solution sizes.

While miniaturization remains the trend for an array of system designs, many of these designs also require a wide range of input voltages. For example, supply voltages in factory automation equipment are susceptible to large fluctuations due to long transmission lines. USB-C and broad 12V nominal applications require up to 24V of working voltage protection against transients due to hot plugging of supplies and/or batteries. The newest Himalaya uSLIC power modules extend the portfolio’s range up to 60V versus the previous maximum of 42V and come in a solution size (2.6mm x 3.0mm x 1.5mm) less than half the size of the closest competitive offering. The modules feature a synchronous wide-input Himalaya buck regulator with built-in FETs, compensation and other functions with an integrated shielded inductor. Having the inductor in the module simplifies the toughest aspect of power supply design, enabling designers—even those with little power expertise—to create a robust, reliable power supply in less than a day.

The newest uSLIC modules are:

MAXM17552, a 4 to 60V, 100mA module with 100 to 900kHz adjustable switching frequency, 82% efficiency (24V VIN at 5V/0.1A) and external clock synchronization in a 2.6mm x 3mm x 1.5mm package

MAXM15064, a 4.5 to 60V, 300mA module with 500kHz fixed frequency, 82% efficiency (24V VIN at 5V/0.1A) and built-in output voltage monitoring in a 2.6mm x 3mm x 1.5mm package

MAXM17900, a 4 to 24V, 100mA module with 100 to 900kHz adjustable switching frequency, 86% efficiency (12V VIN at 5V/100mA), external clock synchronization and built-in output voltage monitoring in a 2.6mm x 3mm x 1.5mm package

MAXM17903, a 4.5 to 24V, 300mA module with 500kHz fixed switching frequency, 77% efficiency (12V VIN at 3.3V/300mA) and built-in output voltage monitoring in a 2.6mm x 3mm x 1.5mm package

Key Advantages

Widest Input Voltage Range in the Smallest Size: Industry’s broadest input voltage range (4 to 60V) in the smallest size (2.6mm x 3.0mm x 1.5mm), less than half the size of the closest competing solution.

Ease of Use: One of the toughest design challenges for inexperienced designers is to choose an inductor which will meet the power, size, emission and temperature requirements for a given design. Himalaya uSLIC modules have an integrated shielded inductor which conforms to the standards of the datasheet, meeting all electrical requirements and allowing designers to build a power supply in a few hours. Getting a fully working power supply can be as easy as choosing the input and output capacitor and setting the output voltage through the resistor divider network.

Robust and Compliant with Electromagnetic Interference Standards: Compliant to CISPR 22 (EN 5022) Class B EMI, eliminating the need for power supply redesigns; JEDEC certified to withstand drop, shock and vibration.

Availability and Pricing

The uSLIC modules can be purchased for the following prices: MAXM17552 for $2.53, MAXM15064 for $2.78, MAXM17900 for $1.39, and MAXM17903 for $1.48 (1000-up, FOB USA); they are also available from authorized distributors.

The MAXM17552EVKIT#, MAXM15064EVKIT#, MAXM17900EVKIT# and MAXM17903EVKIT# evaluation kits are available at $29.73 each.

EE-Sim® models are available; for details, visit http://bit.ly/EE_Sim_Maxim

Further information

https://www.maximintegrated.com/uSLIC

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