200W Railway Converters with Pure Convection Cooling

Date
01/08/2019

Categories:
DC-DC Converters

Tag:
@absopulse #converters #railwayconverter #psd

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ABSOPULSE Electronics has recently released the RWY 200-HSA-P2 series of fully encapsulated railway quality DC-DC converters with pure convection cooling. The 200W converters deliver a single, regulated output of 12Vdc, 24Vdc, 36Vdc, 48Vdc or 110Vdc. They accept inputs of 24Vdc, 36Vdc, 48Vdc, 72Vdc or 110Vdc with EN50155 wide input ranges.   

The RWY 200-HSA-P2 units are cooled by a heatsink assembly attached to their under-surface. This enables operation over a -40 to +55oC temperature range without derating. Wider temperature ranges are available on request. The assembly can be mounted to a chassis or DIN-rail. The chassis-mounted option is suitable where a heatsinking surface is not available to provide sufficient conduction cooling. The heatsink assembly also allows for mounting on thermally non-conductive surfaces such as wood, plastic and brick walls.  All RWY 200-HSA-P2 units are shipped with DIN-rail clips, providing customers with both chassis and DIN-rail mounting options.

The converters are fully encapsulated with a thermally conductive MIL-grade silicon rubber compound with a UL94V-0 flammability rating.  Encapsulation ensures protection from high levels of shock and vibration, moisture, dust, salt fog and other contaminants.  

The units meet the requirements of EN50155 for electronic equipment used on railway rolling stock. They are equipped with heavy filtering on the input and output and comply with EN50121-3-2. They also meet EN61000-4-2, EN61000-4-3, EN61000-4-4 and EN61000-4-6. Other protection includes 3000Vdc input-output isolation, overload protection, thermal protection and current limiting.

ABSOPULSE Electronics Ltd.                                                                         

www.absopulse.com

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