High-temperature multilayer stacked capacitors suit commercial & automotive apps

Date
06/10/2013

Categories:
Capacitors, Passive Components

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KEMET's High Temperature KPS HT Series multilayer stacked capacitors have an X8L dielectric and a novel lead-frame technology to vertically stack one or two multilayer ceramic chip capacitors (MLCCs) into a single compact SMT package. The two-chip vertically stacked device offers up to double the capacitance in the same or smaller design footprint, allowing for both component and board space reductions. Providing up to 10mm of board flex capability, KPS HT Series capacitors are environmentally friendly and in compliance with RoHS regulations. They are also capable of Pb-Free reflow profiles and provide extremely low ESR and ESL. Utilizing an X8L dielectric, these devices can provide reliable operation up to 150°C and are well suited for high temperature filtering, bypass and decoupling applications. Typical markets include alternative energy, industrial/lighting, medical, telecommunications, automotive, and defense and aerospace. KPS HT Series stacked capacitors complement KEMET's extensive high temperature product portfolio, with capacitance solutions available for extreme temperature applications up to 260°C. "These devices exhibit a predictable change in capacitance in respect to time and voltage, and feature a minimal change in capacitance in application temperatures up to 150°C," said Craig Scruggs, KEMET Specialty Ceramics Product Manager. "In addition, the construction of the lead-frame isolates the capacitors from the printed circuit board, thereby providing advanced mechanical and thermal stress performance and addressing concerns for audible microphonic noise that may occur when a bias voltage is applied," continued Scruggs. In addition to Commercial grade, Automotive grade devices are available and meet the demanding Automotive Electronics Council's AEC-Q200 qualification requirements. Kemet

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