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High-Efficiency Discovery Drives Low-Power Computing
EDMONTON-- Challenge any modern human to go a day without a phone or computer, and you'd be hard pressed to get any takers. Our collective obsession with all things electronic is driving a dramatic daily drain on the world's power. In fact, according to studies from the Semiconductor
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Date:
12/13/2018
Computer Chip Vulnerabilities Discovered by WSU Researchers

This is Partha Pande, Boeing Centennial Chair, left, and Janardhan Rao Doppa, assistant professor in the School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.

PULLMAN, Wash. - A Washington State University research team has uncovered significant and previously unknown vulnerabilities in high-performance computer chips that could lead to failures in modern electronics. The researchers found they could damage the on-chip communications system and shorten
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Date:
12/13/2018
ESRF Puts its Shining Light in Standby Mode

This is a picture of the ESRF's third generation storage ring to be dismantled.

Grenoble - "No beam for a while. Restart in about 20 months". Early this morning, operators of the ESRF Control room turned off the beam, ending 26 years of very successful operation of the European Synchrotron, the world's most powerful synchrotron light source. 2018, is a key date in the history
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Date:
12/10/2018

Photocathodes With High Quantum Efficiency

Photocathode after its production in the preparatory system.

Teams from the accelerator physics and the SRF groups at HZB are developing a superconducting linear accelerator featuring energy recovery (Energy Recovery Linac) as part of the bERLinPro project. It accelerates an intense electron beam that can then be used for various applications - such as generating brilliant
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Date:
12/07/2018
Supercomputers Without Waste Heat

This is a scanning tunnelling microscope installed in a helium cooling device seen from below (with the sample stage removed). The mechanism for positioning the microscope tip above the sample surface is visible (center of image).

Generally speaking, magnetism and the lossless flow of electrical current ("superconductivity") are competing phenomena that cannot coexist in the same sample. However, for building supercomputers, synergetically combining both states comes with major advantages as compared to today's semiconductor
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Date:
12/07/2018
Fighting Smog Supports Solar Power

Milky, gray smog shrouds many of the valleys and lowlands of eastern China in January 2017. The orange star marks the location of Beijing.

The air in Beijing is often very bad. The city sinks under a brown cover made of exhaust gases from industry, cars and coal fires, which blow a lot of harmful particulate matter, soot, sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides into the air. The dirty air causes massive damage to human health. According to
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Date:
12/06/2018
The main trend in the development of hardware components for digital and analog electronic equipment is to reduce the size of the active regions of diode and transistor structures. This can be achieved by improving the performance characteristics of micro- and nanoelectronics devices (increasing their speed
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Date:
12/06/2018
Helping Broaden Participation of Minorities in STEM Fields

A graduate student gains hands-on experience with state-of-the-art nanotechnology equipment in the Center for Nanotechnology Education and Utilization Teaching Cleanroom.

Traditionally, minority students have been underrepresented in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) programs -- and in the STEM marketplace. And as the U.S. innovation economy continues to grow, there comes an increasing requirement for skilled STEM workers to maintain the nation's status
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Date:
12/06/2018
The next-generation mobile network and fast data transmission solutions can be used to collect a huge amount of data on vehicles on the road. The information can be used, for example, to provide road weather services, carry out road maintenance and control self-driving cars. Ultimately the aim is to reduce accidents. VTT's
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Date:
12/05/2018
Artificial Synapses Made From Nanowires

Image captured by an electron microscope of a single nanowire memristor (highlighted in colour to distinguish it from other nanowires in the background image). Blue: silver electrode, orange: nanowire, yellow: platinum electrode. Blue bubbles are dispersed over the nanowire. They are made up of silver ions and form a bridge between the electrodes which increases the resistance.

Scientists from Jülich together with colleagues from Aachen and Turin have produced a memristive element made from nanowires that functions in much the same way as a biological nerve cell. The component is able to both save and process information, as well as receive numerous signals in parallel. The resistive
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Date:
12/05/2018
Blast to the Future

Principal investigator Subramanian Sankaranarayanan (left), and co-principal investigators Mathew Cherukara (center), Henry Chan (right) and Badri Narayanan (not pictured) are developing a new machine learning based software that will enable industry to more quickly and efficiently perform the molecular dynamics simulations they need to vet the performance of new materials for their products.

Discovering and designing new materials is frequently an expensive and time-intensive process. To speed it up and create new materials for everything from aeronautics to wind turbines, scientists have begun to rely on complex modeling and simulation platforms. Thanks to a new grant from the U.S. Department
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Date:
12/05/2018
A Step Closer to Fusion Energy

Researchers have moved a step closer to harnessing fusion energy by showing how imaging enables better testing of components for devices.

Harnessing nuclear fusion, which powers the sun and stars, to help meet earth's energy needs, is a step closer after researchers showed that using two types of imaging can help them assess the safety and reliability of parts used in a fusion energy device. Scientists from Swansea University, Culham
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Date:
12/05/2018
Aluminum Nitride to Extend Life of Solar Power Plants

NUST MISIS scientists together with their colleagues from the Central Metallurgical R&D Institute (Cairo, Egypt) have developed a composite material which will extend the life of solar towers -- installations for collecting Solar thermal energy -- from 2-3 to 5 years. The research article has been published in the Renewable Energy journal.

Today, solar power plants (SPP) are becoming increasingly popular, making it possible to collect and process solar energy on an industrial scale. So-called solar towers are among the most promising types of SPPs. This is a special structure that is a high tower with a water tank and a turbine system inside.
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Date:
12/04/2018
A bit of a Stretch ... Material That Thickens as it's Pulled

Liquid crystal elastomer with auxetic capabilities, showing its flexibility and high optical quality.

Scientists have discovered the first synthetic material that becomes thicker - at the molecular level - as it is stretched. Researchers led by Dr Devesh Mistry from the University of Leeds discovered a new non-porous material that has unique and inherent "auxetic" stretching properties.
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Date:
12/04/2018
Full of Energy

(Left to right) University of Utah electrical and computer engineering assistant professor Sriram Krishnamoorthy, associate professor Mike Scarpulla, and assistant professor Berardi Sensale-Rodriguez have received a $1.88 million grant to study the properties of gallium oxide as a semiconductor for more efficient power converters. The material could prove to be much more efficient, losing less heat and providing longer power to devices such as drones or all-electric planes, trains and buses.

Electricity as a form of energy is not exactly efficient because much of it is lost as heat. Or as University of Utah electrical and computer engineering associate professor Mike Scarpulla says: "Heat is the universe's garbage can for energy." Inside power systems, converters and electronic
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Date:
12/04/2018
Graphene Unlocks New Potential For 'Smart Textiles'

Graphene unlocks new potential for 'smart textiles.'

The quest to create affordable, durable and mass-produced 'smart textiles' has been given fresh impetus through the use of the wonder material Graphene. An international team of scientists, led by Professor Monica Craciun from the University of Exeter Engineering department, has pioneered a new technique
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Date:
12/04/2018

 



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